Macarthur Strategic Waste Alliance

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Waste and Resource Recovery (WARR) Strategy 2019-2021

This publication is a NSW EPA Waste Less, Recycle More Initiative funded from the waste levy.

This document has been prepared on behalf of, and for the exclusive use of Macarthur Strategic Waste Alliance and its members.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Table of Contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS ................................................................................................................................................................ 3
ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................................................ ................... 5
DEFINITIONS ................................................................................................................................................................ ................ 6
1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................................................ . 7
2 TRANSISITION TO STRATEGIC WASTE ALLIANCE AN OVERVIEW ................................ ......................... 8
3 THE MACARTHUR REGION ................................................................................................................................ ........... 8
5 WHERE ARE WE TODAY? ................................................................................................................................ ............... 12
4.1 Population and Demographics ................................................................................................ ............................... 12
4.2 Waste and Resource Recovery Collection and processing Systems ................................................................ ..... 15
4.3 Current Waste Infrastructure in the Region ................................................................................................ ......... 15
4.4 Current Performance ................................................................................................................................ ............. 16
4.5 Kerbside Audits ................................................................................................................................ ...................... 17
4.6 Container Deposit Scheme Audit ................................................................................................ .......................... 19
4.7 Illegal Dumping ................................................................................................................................ ...................... 20
4.8 Litter Management ................................................................................................................................ ................. 21
5 KEY SUCCESSES FROM LAST FOUR YEARS ................................................................................................ .......... 23
5.1 Theme 1: Local and Regional Planning ................................................................................................ ................ 23
5.2 Theme 2: Waste Avoidance and Reduction ................................................................................................ ........... 23
5.3 Theme 3: Recycling and Landfill diversion ................................................................................................ .......... 23
5.4 Theme 4: Litter and Illegal Dumping ................................................................................................ ................... 23
5.5 Theme 5: Management of Problem Waste ................................................................................................ ............. 24
6 WHERE DO WE WANT TO GO? ................................................................................................................................ ..... 24
6.1 Vision ................................................................................................................................................................ ....... 24
6.2 Mission ................................................................................................................................................................ ..... 24
6.3 Strategy ................................................................................................................................................................ ... 25
6.4 Aims ................................................................................................................................................................ ......... 25
7 HOW WILL WE GET THERE? ................................................................................................................................ ....... 25
7.1 Waste and Recycling Infrastructure Needs ................................................................................................ .......... 25
7.2 Planning and Waste Considerations ................................................................................................ ...................... 25
7.3 Reuse and Recycle Waste from Council Operations ................................................................ ............................ 25
7.4 Management of Food Organics ................................................................................................ ............................. 25
7.5 Education and Engagement ................................................................................................................................ ... 26
7.6 Litter ................................................................................................................................................................ ........ 26
7.7 Illegal Dumping ................................................................................................................................ ...................... 26
7.8 Problem Wastes ................................................................................................................................ ...................... 26
7.9 Funding Opportunities ................................................................................................................................ ........... 26
7.10 Engagement with Neighbouring Councils and Regions ................................................................ ....................... 26
8 THEMES ................................................................................................................................................................ ............... 27
8.1 Theme 1: Planning for Waste and Resource Recovery ................................................................ ....................... 27
8.2 Theme 2: Waste Avoidance and Reduction ................................................................................................ .......... 27
8.3 Theme 3: Recycling and Landfill Diversion ................................................................................................ ........ 27
8.4 Theme 4: Litter and Illegal Dumping ................................................................................................ ................... 28
8.5 Theme 5: Management of Problem Wastes ................................................................................................ .......... 28
8.6 Theme 6: Advocacy ................................................................................................................................ ............... 29
9 ACTION PLAN ................................................................................................................................................................ .... 29
10 STRATEGIC REVIEW ................................................................................................................................ ...................... 29
11 APPENDICES ................................................................................................................................................................ ...... 30
Appendix 1 – STRATEGIES AND POLICIES DRIVING WASTE AVOIDANCE AND RESOURCE RECOVERY IN THE MACARTHUR REGION ................................................................................................................................ ............ 30
National Policy Drivers ................................................................................................................................ ...................... 30
State Government Policy Drivers ................................................................................................................................ ....... 30
Local Policy Drivers ................................................................................................................................ ........................... 31
Appendix 2 – WASTE AND RESOURCE RECOVERY COLLECTION SYSTEMS ................................ .................... 32
Appendix 3 – KERBSIDE WASTE AND RESOURCE RECOVERY COLLECTION AND PROCESSING CONTRACTS ................................................................................................................................................................ ........ 33
Appendix 4 – SPRING FARM FACILITY OPERATIONS ................................................................ .............................. 35
Appendix 5 – WASTE INFRASTRUCTURE ACROSS WIDER SYDNEY REGION ................................ ................... 36
Appendix 6 – EXISTING PROGRAMS AND INITIATIVES ................................................................ ........................... 38
Appendix 7 – REGIONAL ACTION PLAN 2019-2021 ................................................................................................ ..... 40

ACRONYMS

ABS – Australian Bureau of Statistics

ARRT – Advanced Resource Recovery Treatment

CDS – Container Deposit Scheme

C&I – Commercial and Industrial

C&D – Construction and Demolition

CRC – Community Recycling Centre

CRM – Customer Response Management System

DCP – Development Control Plan

DA – Development Application

EfW – Energy from Waste

E-waste – Electronic Waste

NSW EPA – New South Wales Environment Protection Authority

FOGO – Food Organics Garden Organics

LGA – Local Government Area

MACROC – Macarthur Regional Organisation of Councils

MBT – Mechanical Biological Treatment

MCSL – Macarthur Centre for Sustainable Living

MGB – Mobile Garbage Bin

MRF – Materials Recovery Facility

MSW – Municipal Solid Waste

RID online – Reduce Illegal Dumping Reporting System

SWA – Strategic Waste Alliance

WARR – Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery

DEFINITIONS

Australian Packaging Covenant – the voluntary co-regulatory arrangement between industry and all levels of government. When individual organisations sign the covenant, they agree to undertake certain actions to reduce waste and increase recycling. Those that do not sign the covenant are subject to penalty measures enforceable by state government.

Commercial and Industrial waste (C&I) – solid waste generated by the business sector as a result of institutional, commercial, manufacturing or industrial activity, as well as solid wastes created by state and federal government entities, schools and tertiary institutions. Does not usually include waste from construction and demolition (C&D) activities.

Composting – the process of controlled biological decomposition of organic wastes. Composting can take place on materials separated from the waste stream either at the source, in the initial stages of a recovery process such as backyard, neighbourhood and regional facilities, or it can be accomplished in large quantities in windrows, static piles and enclosed vessels.

Construction and Demolition waste (C&D) – waste arising from residential, civil and commercial construction and demolition activities, such as fill material (for example, soil), asphalt, bricks and timber. Does not include waste from the commercial and industrial waste stream.

Contamination rate – the amount of material collected for recycling which is subsequently rejected (eg due to incorrect material type as a percentage of total recyclable material collected).

Diversion rate – the net percentage of the waste stream diverted from landfill disposal.

Domestic garbage – household waste deposited by residents into designated garbage bins. Contents may include items that are non-recyclables, including disposable nappies, sanitary items, Food organics, plastic bags and plastic film.

E-waste – any manufactured product containing electric or electronic components. Usually refers to computer and TV equipment, such as desktop and laptop devices, monitors, printers etc, but also includes DVD and video players, MP3 players, televisions, lighting, electronic tools, toys, leisure and sporting equipment, medical equipment, industrial monitoring and control equipment and vending machines.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) – manufacturers of consumer products should be responsible for the full lifecycle of their products, from original manufacturing to final disposal. EPR is also known as product stewardship, manufacturer responsibility or cradle-to-grave.

Garden organics – organic material deposited by residents into garden organics bins or presented in applicable council clean ups for recycling. Contents typically include grass clippings, tree prunings and cut flowers.

In-vessel composting – composting in an enclosed vessel so that the biological decomposition of organic material can be controlled, thereby accelerating the decomposition process and capturing gases to reduce odours.

Kerbside clean-up – the collection of residential waste from the kerbside for items that cannot fit into any of the council provided bins and excludes hazardous waste materials.

Landfill – a site for the disposal of garbage and other waste materials by burial.

Landfill diversion rate – the amount of material not sent to landfill as a percentage of the total waste generated.

Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) – a facility at which recyclable materials are separated into individual commodities using a variety of mechanical and manual sorting techniques. In its basic, mechanised form, a MRF consists of a conveyor belt on which commingled recyclables are tipped at one end and, as the belt moves, items are removed according to type. Mechanical separation methods include tumbling drums (trommels), magnets, optical sorters, rotating discs, blown air, inclined moving belts, vibrating trays and rubber flaps and other devices.

Municipal Solid Waste – solid waste collected by the councils. It includes waste generated from domestic (household) premises and local government activities such as building and repairs, street-sweeping, litter and street tree-lopping. May also include some waste originating from commercial activities, office buildings, institutions such as schools and government buildings, and small businesses that use municipal services.

Putrescible waste – organic waste that can decompose, such as food scraps.

Recovery rate – the amount of material recovered or used to generate energy from a product group as a percentage of overall consumption.

Recycling – system of recycling in which the generator segregates wastes according to material type and places them in containers for separate collection.

Recycling Rate – the percentage of material recycled relative to the total waste generated.

Residual – waste that requires handling in a disposal facility (for example, a landfill) and may comprise non-recyclable waste materials from a MRF or other processing facility or composting operation.

Source Separation – physical sorting of the waste stream into its components at the point of generation.

Transfer Station – an intermediate facility for the temporary storage of waste, which is then consolidated and transferred by road, or by rail, to a landfill or other facility for disposal or recycling.

Waste Hierarchy – the concept that waste should be dealt with according to a structure of actions of decreasing priority, starting with reducing it, then reusing it, then recycling it. In its simplest form, the Waste Management Hierarchy is often given as ‘Reduce, Reuse, Recycle’ but there are other variations including ‘Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Dispose’, ‘Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Recover and Residuals Management’, ‘Avoidance, Reuse, Recycling, Recovery of Energy, Treatment, Containment, Disposal’.

1 INTRODUCTION

The NSW Government implemented a new waste and recycling initiative (Waste Less Recycle More) in 2013 after the 2012 review of the waste levy. The initiative provided funding to regional groups of Councils to assist in assessing their current situation and to work out where they want to go and how to get there. The initial funding program of three years was extended by the NSW State Government for a further four years from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2021.

The three Macarthur Strategic Waste Alliance (SWA) member Councils, being Camden, Campbelltown and Wollondilly, have come together to update the action plan and set new actions to investigate options to reduce waste, increase recycling and combat illegal dumping and litter across the region. The Councils have identified their main action which is to ensure that there are sufficient waste services and infrastructure available into the future.

To ensure consistency and allow comparison with other regions, the structure of this report is based on the NSW EPA’s Regional Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategic Guidelines.

This Strategic Waste Alliance Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy (The Strategy) covers the period 2018-2021 and provides a framework and direction for regional action to ensure its services and activities meet the targets set. The Strategy considers relevant National and State legislation, policies, and targets in developing the regions strategies and actions. While Local Government will continue to be the main actioning organisation, the regions success will rely in large part on supporting policies and funded programs from other levels of government to implement the improved practices aimed for in the Strategy.

2 TRANSISITION TO STRATEGIC WASTE ALLIANCE – AN OVERVIEW

The Macarthur Regional Organisation of Councils (MACROC) comprised representation from Camden Council, Campbelltown City Council and Wollondilly Shire Council was dissolved by resolution of each of the member Councils in August and September 2018 with a view to working towards a broader regional collaborative model.

Consequently, at their respective meetings in August and September 2018, Campbelltown, Camden, and Wollondilly Councils resolved that a memorandum of understanding (MOU) be agreed upon to create the Macarthur Strategic Waste Alliance so that funding and programs from the NSW Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) would continue.

3 THE MACARTHUR REGION

The Macarthur region has grown by 27,546 people since the previous strategy was written in 2014. The total population for the region is now 291,627. In total, the Macarthur region covers an area of 328,905 hectares (3,289 km2), which is equal to 0.89 persons per hectare (89 per km2)1.

The Camden Council LGA has a land area of 20,132 hectares (201km2), population of 80,476 (2016 ABS estimation), and a population density of 4.33 persons per hectare (400 per km2)1.

The Campbelltown City Council LGA has a land area of 31,222 hectares (312 km2), population of 161,409 (2016 ABS estimation), and a population density of 5.17 persons per hectare (517 per km2)2. The Campbelltown City Council LGA is the most populated and has the highest population density in comparison to the other Councils within the Macarthur region.

Figure 1: The Macarthur Region

1 Profile.ID, 2016. Community Profile Camden, Available a t: http://profile.id.com.au/camden/home [Accessed 29/11/2017].

2 Profile.ID, 2016. Community Profile Campbelltown, Available a t: http://profile.id.com.au/campbelltown/home [Accessed 29/11/2017].

The Wollondilly Shire LGA has a land area of 255,697 hectares (2,557 km2), population of 49,742 (2016 ABS estimation), and a population density of 0.19 persons per hectare (19 per km2)3. The Wollondilly Shire LGA is the largest and the least populated of the three LGAs.

The Macarthur region has experienced steady growth over the past 10 years and is expected to grow by more than 100,000 additional households over the next 20 years. The NSW Government has set the “South West Priority Growth Area” which includes areas of Camden and Campbelltown areas and the Government’s new plan, ‘The Greater Macarthur Priority Growth Area’ takes in large areas of Campbelltown and Wollondilly Shires. These two areas are expected to provide an additional 75,500 homes

in the region4. These growth areas are shown in Figure 2. The Government has also marked the town of Wilton, in Wollondilly Shire, to grow by 15,000 residents over the next 20-30 years.

As the community grows, it will create additional challenges for waste management within the Region. The Councils will need to ensure that adequate planning, services, along with waste collection and disposal systems are in place to manage this increase in waste generation.

By encouraging the community to create less waste in the first instance and facilitating alternatives to landfill, the Councils can ensure that the amount of waste being generated does not exceed the capacity of available facilities and services.

Figure 2: The greater Macarthur growth area and South West growth area5

3 Profile.ID, 2016. Community Profile Wollondilly Shire, Available a t: http://profile.id.com.au/wollondilly/home [Accessed 29/11/2017].

4 http://www.planning.nsw.gov.au/Plans-for-your-area

5 http://www.planning.nsw.gov.au/Plans-for-your-area/Priority-Growth-Areas-and-Precincts

Each of the Macarthur Councils currently has a three-bin kerbside waste recycling system and bulky waste collection. While the Councils have individual arrangements in place for the collection of kerbside waste, they have jointly initiated a long-term contract for its receival, processing and disposal of waste. The Councils are negotiating with the processing contractor for improved waste processing and landfill diversion at an alternate facility as a result of the closure of the Spring Farm ARRT waste processing operation.

To ensure that the region’s waste resources are managed in a responsible and sustainable way into the future, planning beyond the current contract and beyond this strategy, is a critical aspect for the Region.

This Strategy outlines the Macarthur Councils’ current position and sets out a strategic approach to managing the Region’s waste into the future. In updating this Strategy, the Councils will continue with the current vision and mission statements as follows:

Vision To achieve the best value, most socially acceptable and environmentally sustainable management of waste across the Macarthur region.

Mission Sustainable and adaptive management of waste and recovered resources.

Under the Strategy and a number of Federal and State Government policies and programs, the Councils will continue to strive to ensure that as much value is derived from recovered resources as possible to protect the environment, ensure financial and long-term viability of waste collection and processing solutions, and to minimise the costs of waste management and resource recovery for the community.

As part of the Strategy, the Strategic Waste Alliance will submit an updated action plan to the NSW EPA each year and report on progress. The Strategy adheres to the principles of the Waste Hierarchy, establishing a preference to avoid creating waste in the first instance, and to dispose of untreated waste to landfill only as a last resort. The principles of the Waste Hierarchy are outlined in Figure 3.

The themes in the Strategy have been adopted in consideration of the key characteristics of the region that will relate to its future waste management.

Figure 3: Waste Hierarchy

4 STRATEGIES AND POLICIES DRIVING WASTE AVOIDANCE AND RESOURCE RECOVERY IN THE MACARTHUR REGION

A summary of key policy drivers which set the scene for waste and resource management in Australia is outlined in Appendix 1. The legislative framework is constantly evolving and requires regular monitoring. The main piece of legislation impacting on Councils’ waste operations is the NSW Government WARR Strategy 2014-2021. New targets have been set for Councils to achieve and are listed below:

NSW Government WARR Strategy 2014-2021 addresses the following areas:

Support investment in infrastructure;
Encourage innovation and improve recycling behaviour;
Develop new markets for recycled materials, and
Reduce litter and illegal dumping.

The strategy sets the following targets for 2021-22

Avoiding and reducing the amount of waste generated per person in NSW;
Increase recycling rates to:

º 70% for municipal solid waste.

º 70% for commercial and industrial waste.

º 80% for construction and demolition waste.

Increase waste diverted from landfill to 75%;
Managing problem waste better, establishing 80 drop-off facilities (Community Recycling Centres) and services across NSW;
Reducing litter, with 40% fewer items (compared to 2012) by 2017; and
Combat illegal dumping with 30% fewer incidents (compared to 2011) by 2017.

Waste Less, Recycle More – The NSW Government has announced the extension of the Waste Less, Recycle More initiative with a further $337 million over four years from 2017-2021. This extension guarantees funding to continue the work already underway to modernise the waste sector in NSW, deliver waste and recycling services to the community and ensure a clean environment.

20-Year Waste Strategy – The NSW EPA is leading the development of a 20-year Waste Strategy for NSW in partnership with Infrastructure NSW. The Strategy will set a 20-year vision for reducing waste, driving sustainable recycling markets and identifying and improving the state and regional waste infrastructure network. It is expected that the Strategy will be complete at the end of 2019. The 20-year Waste Strategy will create a long-term vision and roadmap for waste and resource recovery in NSW, and include;

New long term 20-year goals for waste generation, resource recovery and landfill diversion
New policy positions and strategic directions in relation to waste avoidance and resource recovery
A plan for new or enhanced policies and programs to improve waste collection and distribution
A framework for the delivery of an integrated state infrastructure network
An alignment of policy and regulation to achieve long-term strategic objectives
A plan to strengthen data quality and access

5 WHERE ARE WE TODAY?

4.1 Population and Demographics

The Macarthur region is growing rapidly. In 2015-2016, its population was just over 291,000. This is a growth of over 40,000 people since 2011/2012 and it is expected that this will grow by further 100,000 by 2026, and reach approximately 530,000 by 2036.

Figure 4, 5 and 6 demonstrates the significant population growth within the Macarthur region. Population growth can result in increased waste and recycling volumes, which will affect the capacity of existing and future waste infrastructure and services.

Between 2016 and 2036, the population for Camden Council is forecast to increase by 152,822 persons (189.89% growth), at an average annual change of 5.47% making Camden one of the fastest growing Councils in NSW. Between 2016 and 2036, the population for

Campbelltown City is forecast to increase by 114,370 persons (70.86% growth), at an average annual change of 2.71%. Between 2016 and 2036, the population for Wollondilly Shire is forecast to increase by 28,327 persons (56.95% growth), at an average annual change of 2.28%.

Dwelling type is an important determinant for the three Macarthur Councils in providing an efficient and effective service to their community. A greater concentration of higher density dwellings is likely to attract more young adults and smaller households, often renting. Larger, detached or separate dwellings are more likely to attract families and prospective families. Figures 4, 5 and 6 portray the changes in the Macarthur region resulting in significant shifts in how the council deals with their roles and functions within the Waste Management and Resource Recovery operations.

Figure 4: Camden Council Forecast population, households and average household size

Figure 5: Campbelltown City Council Forecast population, households and average household size

Figure 6: Wollondilly Shire Council Forecast population, households and average household size

4.2 Waste and Resource Recovery Collection and processing Systems

The Councils within the region provide the community with access to a range of services that endeavour to manage waste efficiently and cost effectively, with minimal impact on health and the environment. These services have not changed since the last Macarthur WARR Strategy 2014-2017 and the details of the services are provided in Appendix 2.

However, with the increasing population, changing demographics and housing styles across the region, the Councils will need to periodically review the services to ensure the services are still best practice and will continue to meet the needs of the community. It is also essential that the Councils consider the future provision of waste services in any new development areas to ensure best practice waste collection can continue.

Materials collected at the kerbside are delivered to various facilities within the Spring Farm Resource Recovery Centre (Spring Farm RRC). This includes domestic garbage, commingled recyclables, garden organics and materials from kerbside clean-ups. Within the Spring Farm facility, recyclables are processed at the materials recycling facility; green waste is processed at the Camden Organics Resource Recovery Facility and the garbage is redirected to other SUEZ facilities.

The three Macarthur Councils are continuing to investigate options for future waste disposal and processing for the region to ensure that diversion targets set by the NSW EPA can be met.

Waste and Resource Recovery Collection, Processing and Disposal Contracts

Each of the Councils has its own arrangements in place in relation to collection services, ranging from long term contracts through to Councils’ own day labour staff.

Camden Council employs day labour and vehicles directly to collect garbage, recyclables, garden organics and clean up waste. Council employees are also responsible for provision of services to Council facilities and collection and disposal of waste arising from Councils’ own business activities and services.

Campbelltown and Wollondilly Councils each contract service providers for collection and transport of kerbside collected garbage, recyclables, garden organics and clean up waste.

Council employees or contractors are also engaged to provide waste and recycling collection and disposal services to the Councils’ facilities, as well as collection and disposal of street sweeper waste, litter and illegally dumped waste.

The Councils share a joint contract with SUEZ for the processing and disposal of kerbside collected wastes and recyclables. This contract commenced in 2009 and will expire in June 2024.

Appendix 3 contains a summary of the contractual arrangements for the kerbside waste collection for each of the Councils in the Macarthur region.

4.3 Current Waste Infrastructure in the Region

The Spring Farm Resource Recovery Centre is located in the Camden LGA and is contracted to receive, and process kerbside collected garbage, recyclables, garden organics and clean up waste from the Macarthur Councils and Wingecarribee Shire Council. Detail of the Spring Farm facility is provided in Appendix 4.

Camden and Campbelltown Councils do not own any operational solid waste management facilities. Wollondilly Council owns the Bargo Waste Management Centre which is operated by a contractor. All facilities within the Macarthur region and the wider Sydney are listed in Appendix 5, however it is noted that these may not be available due to being near or at capacity.

Concerned about not meeting NSW EPA waste reduction targets and waste contract targets not being met, along with limited options for waste disposal and processing in the region, in June 2016, the now dissolved MACROC commissioned a report6 into infrastructure options for the Councils. The report notes that in the short term, instead of the three councils sending all their waste to the one facility, they may have to send their individual waste streams to different facilities. Further, in the long-term Councils may need to consider a transfer station to facilitate transporting their waste to a facility further away. In considering other waste disposal options, the Councils are aiming to achieve the EPA WARR targets of 75% diversion from landfill in the short and long term.

The report suggests the possible best practice management of kerbside residual waste by 2024 will most likely involve either:

Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) + process of the MBT residual through Energy from Waste (EfW) technology
Food Organics Garden Organics (FOGO) collection + MBT + Processing of the MBT residual through EfW
FOGO collection + Dirty MRF + processing of the residual through EfW

The choice of technology combination will be dependent upon:

Availability of technology;
Comparative costs;
Community expectations regarding collection options for organics; and
Policy/legislation changes regarding resource recovery.

The June 2016 reports provides options for the Council to consider and continue to investigate infrastructure disposal and processing options for the future. As the population increases across the region the issues of infrastructure and processing of waste will become more urgent.

6 MACROC Infrastructure options assessment. Post collections infrastructure options report. ARCADIS June 2016.

4.4 Current Performance

The Macarthur Councils, along with Wingecarribee, have a disposal and processing contract with SUEZ until 2024. At the beginning of this contract the Spring Farm site, owned by SUEZ (formerly known as SITA), processed recyclables, organics and mixed household waste through a variety of technologies. The aim of the Site was to process all waste streams at a single location, using technologies that maximise the recovery of resources from the waste.

However, not all waste streams are currently processed on site. The mixed household waste is now sent to an alternative licenced landfill facility.

In 2017-2018, the region generated 136,168 tonnes of household material from the three-bin system and clean-up materials. With processing of 61,296 tonnes recyclables and green waste, the region sent 77,568 tonnes to landfill.

This gives the region a 56% recycling rate. These numbers are details in Table 1 below.

The Councils’ high recycling rate of over 70% of kerbside collected MSW during the initial years of the MACROC WARR Strategy 2014-2017, was achieved by a combination of a three-bin collection system, and advanced processing technology for recyclables, garden organics and domestic garbage. However, during the latter half of the MACROC WARR Strategy 2014-2017; where waste was not processed through the AWT; then recovery rates have decreased to 56% but are still slightly above the State average.

Figure 7 provides a historical waste trend and projections for each waste stream7. This graph illustrates that there is consistent work for the Region to try and reduce waste generation.

Table 1: 2017/2018 Waste tonnage data provided by Councils in EPA waste resource and recovery data

Tonnes

Red Bin

Yellow Bin

Green Bin

Clean-up

Wollondilly

9,772

4,871

4,488

2,219

Camden

18,234

9,512

9,857

2,916

Campbelltown

34,390

14,383

16,974

8,552

350,000

300,000

250,000

200,000

Tonnes

150,000

100,000

50,000

0

2015-16 2016-17 2018-19 2020-21 2022-23 2024-25 2026-27 2028-29 2030-31 2032-33 2034-35

Kerbside residual

Kerbside recycling

Kerbside garden organics

Clean-up waste

Total

Arcadis, 2016, Historical and Projected Waste Generation,

data extracted from tables

Figure 7: Arcadis data on historical Waste Trends and Projections12

7 Arcadis, 2016, MACROC Infrastructure Options assessment

4.5 Kerbside Audits

Audits of kerbside bins were recently undertaken by Camden and Wollondilly Councils. Organic material, mostly food organics is the largest percentage of items in the garbage bin. There are also recyclable items still being placed into the garbage bin for all Council areas that could be recovered if they were placed into the yellow lid recycling bin. Figures 8 and 9 show the results of the audits for the garbage and recycling bins.

Wollondilly Shire Council

The audit of the bins in Wollondilly Shire was undertaken in June 2017. It was found that the average Wollondilly household generates 9.6 kg of general waste per week, 5.8kg of commingled recycling per week and 0.5 kg of garden organics per week, making a total of 15.9 kg per household per week. The audit showed that the bin presentation rates and weights in the green bin were low, possibly because there had been a very dry Autumn and it was Winter when the audit was conducted, with a low vegetation growing season.8

The audit showed that landfill diversion could increase by 8% if all currently accepted recyclables were put into the comingled recycling bin and another 1% diversion could be achieved if all garden organics were placed into the organics bin. Further, if the food organics and other organics were recovered through an AWT, then diversion would increase by another 23%. Over page is an outline of what the audit found in each bin type.

Garbage

The largest component of the garbage bin is food (31%) and other organics (15%), followed by nappies and feminine hygiene products (14%), plastic (12%, including plastic bags and containers). These items make up more than 60% of all general waste.

Eleven per cent (11%) of general waste is recyclables that should be placed into the commingled recycling bin, with glass containers and paper/cardboard being the most common material; the remainder consists of plastic, steel and aluminium. Misplaced garden organics make up two (2%) per cent of general waste.

E-waste and hazardous waste each represent 1% of general waste.

Recycling

Recyclable materials make up 83% of the recycling bin. These recyclable materials comprise glass (36%), paper and cardboard (34%), plastic (8%), steel containers (2%), aluminium containers (2%) and other recyclable metal (1%).

Seventeen per cent (17%) of the commingled recycling stream is contamination. The main contaminants are non-recyclable contaminated or soiled paper (3%) and bagged material (3%), followed by textiles, containerized food and liquids, nappies and feminine hygiene products, and other materials (each 2%). These should all be placed into the garbage bin.

Garden Organics

The sample of bins audited contained a very high contamination rate of 26.5%. The main contaminant was building materials, which made up 18% of the organics sample. This was mainly plywood, as well as some bricks. Food was the next largest contaminant at 5% of the organics stream. The high level of building material contamination may have been a result of a once off contamination event. Further audits will need to be conducted to confirm this.

Campbelltown City Council

The 2012 data has been used to represent Campbelltown in Figure 6 & 7 as no recent audit data is available.

Camden Council

The Camden audit9 was undertaken in April 2016 and found the average Camden household generates 12.67 kg of general waste per week, 7.14 kg of commingled recycling per week and 11.61 kg of garden organics per week.

The audit found that the landfill diversion rate could be increased by 16% if all food organics, garden organics and recyclables were recovered.

Garbage

The largest material category is AWT compostable organics (50%), followed by plastics (12%), including both recyclable and non-recyclable. Other materials include nappies (10%), paper products (6%) and glass (3%).

Recycling

Paper (44%) and glass containers (29%) make up most of the recycling bin content, PET (4%), HDPE (3%) and other plastics makes up the next largest category. The remaining materials include organics (4%), aluminium cans (1%), steel cans (0.4%), other metal (3%) and building waste (1%). 4% are categorised as other and 0.3% are hazardous.

Garden Organics

Garden/vegetation organics made up 95.8% of the total. Wood (1.02%), food (0.6%) and earth-based material (0.8%) are the main contaminants. Paper makes up 0.12% while other putrescible accounts for 0.35%.

8 Report for Wollondilly Shire Council, Audit of three stream domestic kerbside waste including CDS. A Prince Consulting, June 2017

9 Domestic Kerbside Bin Audit by property size: weekly three bin system. April 2016 by EC Sustainable for Camden Council.

Figure 8: Camden, Campbelltown and Wollondilly - Percentage Composition of Domestic Garbage by weight

Camden Campbelltown

6.23%

1.96%

2.91%

0.02%

10.09%

49.70%

11.57%

16.70%

Organics Other Plastics

Glass

Paper Products Nappies

Ferrous

Non Ferrous

Organics Other Plastics

Glass

Paper Products Building & Earth Waste

Ferrous Non Ferrous Hazardous

Wollondilly

2.30% 1.20%

Organics Other Nappies Plastics

Glass Containers Paper & Cardboard Steel Containers

Figure 9: Camden Campbelltown and Wollondilly – Percentage Composition of Recyclables Bin by weight10

Camden Campbelltown

Paper

Glass Containers Other Plastics PET

Organics

Other HDPE

Other Metal Aluminium Cans Other Glass

Building & Earth Waste Steel Cans Hazardous

Paper

Glass Containers Contaminants PET

HDPE

Steel Cans Other Plastics (Incl. PVC)

Aluminium Cans Liquid Paperboard

Wollondilly

Glass

Paper & Cardboard Contaminants Plastic

Steel Cans

Aluminum Containers Liquid Paperboard Other Metal

10 Source: McGregor Environmental Services Domestic Kerbside Waste Stream Audit for: City of Campbelltown October 2011,

EC Sustainable Domestic Kerbside Bin for Camden Council, 2016,

APC Waste Consultants audit of three stream domestic kerbside waste for Wollondilly Shire Council, 2017

4.6 Container Deposit Scheme Audit

In October 2017 MACROC commissioned a pre-Container Deposit Scheme (CDS) audit11 of the kerbside recycling stream across Macarthur area. A key finding of the audit was that approximately 79% by count (or 63% by volume) of beverage containers in the comingled recycling stream are eligible under CDS. This means that the average household generates approximately 18 CDS eligible containers per week. The most common types of all beverage containers were flavoured water/soft drink and beer; representing over 50% of containers in the recycling stream.

In September 2018 the Macarthur SWA commissioned a follow up Post-Container Deposit Scheme (CDS) audit12, which provided a comparison between the two audit results. Consequently, there was a 11.3% decrease in percentage by weight of CDS-eligible containers which is likely due to residents taking their eligible CDS containers to collection points rather than the kerbside bin.

The major differences between the two audits was the proportional increase in weight of PET (36% pre-CDS to 49% post-CDS) and the reduction in glass (22% to 7%).

Overall, it appears that Macarthur residents have been returning around one in every three containers via the Return and Earn CDS program. The total count of eligible CDS beverage containers per household per week decreased from a pre-CDS baseline of 17.97 to 11.58 (or a 35% reduction).

11 Pre-Container Deposit Scheme Audit. A submission to Macarthur Regional Organisation of Councils. MRA Consulting, December 2017

12 Post-Container Deposit Scheme Audit. A submission to Macarthur Regional Organisation of Councils. MRA Consulting, January 2019

4.7 Illegal Dumping

The NSW EPA has provided guidelines on collecting illegal dumping data and parameters for data collection. They also have a “Report Illegal Dumping Online” (RID online – public version) application that is available to members of the public spotting dumping and wishing to report it. All Councils have access to RID Online (private version) and Camden and Wollondilly are using it extensively to map and monitor their illegal dumping. Campbelltown is using their CRM system so data for mapping is not available. The Councils are responsible for the collection of illegally dumped items and the EPA has set the target for reducing the incidents of illegal dumping by 30% by 2020 compared to 2010-2011. The Councils will progressively work towards this goal as resources become available. With the help of RID online mapping, Council can set priority areas for action.

Figure 10 identifies several known hot spots across the LGAs. Although the issue is not limited to the areas indicated on the maps, these hot spots are the focus of current efforts to reduce the incidence, effects and costs of illegal dumping.

Figure 10: Illegal Dumping Hot Spots

Camden Hot Spots

4.8 Litter Management

In 2016 SWA was successful in receiving grant funding from the EPA to develop a Litter Regional Implementation Plan (L-RIP) (the plan was developed and managed by MACROC prior to the transition to SWA) to identify and monitor litter hotspots across each local government region. The study13 was done using the EPA litter check guidelines.

Camden Council

Six hotspots were identified in Camden LGA. Roadsides were identified as the biggest litter sites and beverage containers; specifically, paper cups, were the highest littered item along the roadside.

Campbelltown City Council

Campbelltown City Council identified five hot spot sites and one clean-up site. Roadsides were identified as the biggest trouble litter sites and cigarette butts and beverage containers including paper cups were the highest littered item at those roadside sites.

Wollondilly Shire Council

Wollondilly Shire Council identified six hot spot sites. Roadsides were identified as the biggest trouble litter sites and beverage containers; specifically, plastic bottles were the highest littered item at those roadside sites.

13 Litter Project 2016 produced for Camden City Council; Litter Project 2016 produced for Campbelltown City Council; Litter Project 2016 produced for Wollondilly Shire Council. Knowwaste Pty Ltd - Waste and Sustainability Consultancy.

In 2018 the SWA was successful in gaining another NSW EPA litter grant under the L-RIP Stage 3 program. Two projects were carried out, Building Solutions and Operation 40.

Building Solutions

This project focused on the reduction of the volume of containers, take-a-way wrappers and coffee cup litter ‘leaking’ from building sites in suburban areas and residential roads across Macarthur. This was achieved through educating and enforcing litter compliance on building sites. MSWA, Council Rangers and the selected consultant worked together on this project. One Hot Spot (building-site area) was focused on per LGA.

The project targeted to obtain a 25% reduction in the volume of container, takeaway and coffee cup litter collected on suburban roads leading to and from the building sites. As a result of the project the number of littered items observed outside the building sites reduced by a regional average of 58% and the volume of litter reduced by 80%.

Operation 40

This project focused on the reduction of littering and reducing the volume of containers, take-a-way wrappers and coffee cup litter being dropped from vehicles. This was

achieved through roadside signs to help educate road users and assist in monitoring and enforcement, developing a community of rangers, through the active promotion of EPA report littering from vehicle app.

As a result of the project, the number of items littered at the roadside reduced by a regional average of 21% and the volume of litter reduced by 67%.

Stage 4: Operation 40 Part II

In February 2019, SWA was successful with Stage 4 grant funding under the L-RIP initiative.

This project will build on the success of the Stage 3 projects and continue to focus on the reduction of littering and reducing the volume of containers, take-a-way wrappers, coffee cup and cigarette butt litter being dropped from vehicles by 40% over the project.

SWA will promote community involvement through roadside signs to help educate road users and assist in monitoring and enforcement, developing a community of rangers, through the active promotion of EPA report littering from vehicle app. Three roads per LGA have been targeted, whilst partnering with more entities identified as main ‘litter sources’ such as fast food outlets and service stations. Installation of temporary street chalk art to raise awareness, build greater communication and engagement with the community has also been planned.

5 KEY SUCCESSES FROM LAST FOUR YEARS

5.1 Theme 1: Local and Regional Planning

Review of infrastructure options across the Region was undertaken in 2016 to determine short term and long-term solutions to the current lack of infrastructure in the region.

A pre-Container Deposit Scheme audit was undertaken to establish the number of eligible containers in the recycling bins across the region. Two reverse vending machines have been located within the Macarthur region at the start of the Return and Earn scheme on 1 December 2017. Over time other facilities may open across the region.

SWA Councils participated in a review, with WSROC, of the Council’s Development Control Plans (DCP) and planning guides for waste collection specifications with the aim of identifying similarities and differences so the regions could consider a consistent approach.

5.2 Theme 2: Waste Avoidance and Reduction

Love Food Hate Waste program was promoted through the “Cook It” and children’s book “What’s for dinner” Program by Camden and Campbelltown Councils.

Series of workshops covering waste and recycling topics developed by MCSL with funding and coordination provided by Campbelltown City Council.

Compost and Worm farming workshops for adults hosted by MCSL and rolled out across Wollondilly Shire.

5.3 Theme 3: Recycling and Landfill diversion

Waste and Recycling audits were undertaken to determine where improvements could be made in reduced contamination and increased recycling.

Baseline audit for CDS eligible containers was undertaken prior to the scheme commencing.

There are also annual recycling days run by Councils.

5.4 Theme 4: Litter and Illegal Dumping

RID on line used be Camden and Wollondilly Councils to map, record and monitor illegal dumping across their shires.

Use of EPA campaign materials for Litter (Hey Tosser) and Illegal Dumping (Dob in a Dumper).

Purchase of surveillance cameras by Campbelltown Council for use at illegal dumping hot spots.

Investigation report into Litter hot spots across the region and development of the Litter – Regional Implementation Plan.

5.5 Theme 5: Management of Problem Waste

Annual Household Chemical Cleanout event and Community Recycling Centres (CRC) – Councils continue to host the annual Cleanout events which are organised by EPA.

Campbelltown Council was successful in applying for a Community Recycling Centre grant and is in the process of gaining development application approval for the CRC.

E-waste drop off facilities – E-waste is accepted at Bargo Waste Management Centre in Wollondilly Shire, and the nearest CRC which accepts E-waste is at located outside the region at St. Marys and Liverpool. Therefore, Councils

continue to accept E-waste in kerbside clean-ups to ensure residents have a convenient method of disposal. However, with the introduction of Community Recycling Centres in the Macarthur region, Councils will investigate the collection of e-waste at this facility and then consider the banning of E-waste from kerbside collection, to increase the diversion the E-waste from landfill.

Battery Recycling drop off points were set up in each Council area. This program is free to residents and there are several locations across the region for residents to drop off their batteries.

Sharps collection services are run in partnerships with some pharmacies by Councils in the region, to ensure this type of hazardous waste does not go to landfill.

6 WHERE DO WE WANT TO GO?

The Strategy identifies a number of opportunities to improve waste management performances. These include waste processing, food waste avoidance, reduction of contamination in recyclables and garden organics, addressing the challenging areas of littering and illegal dumping, and extending waste avoidance and recycling initiatives to the Council’s non-domestic waste streams. There are also opportunities to ensure that waste collection systems are aligned with the anticipated future population growth and development across the region.

With the anticipated increase in multi-unit dwellings across the region, the Councils will need to ensure that their planning and development controls include waste guidelines will support the objectives of the Strategy and ensure efficient services can be maintained. This increase in higher density developments will also place increased pressure to ensure that the quality of recyclables remain high and the need to focus on consumer behaviour patterns.

The review of the region’s current position has identified that the five key themes which were initially established in 2014 and are still current for the region going forward to 2021. There is a slight change to Theme 1 to ensure its relevance with the current actions going forward over the next four years. A sixth theme has also been added for this strategy to recognise the active participation of the Strategic Waste Alliance in supporting the Councils:

Planning for waste and resource recovery;
Waste avoidance and reduction;
Recycling and landfill diversion;
Litter and illegal dumping;
Management of problem wastes; and
Advocacy.

These key areas allow the work already begun by the Councils to continue, to address gaps and enhance current efforts. Consideration is also given to the principles of the waste hierarchy, establishing a preference to avoid creating waste in the first instance and to dispose of untreated waste to landfill only as a last resort.

6.1 Vision

To achieve the best value, most socially acceptable and environmentally sustainable management of waste across the Macarthur region.

6.2 Mission

Sustainable and adaptive management of waste and recovered resources.

6.3 Strategy

To maximise resource recovery, diversion of waste from landfill, increase waste avoidance and appropriate disposal of waste through encouraging regional waste processing options, community education, increased engagement with stakeholders - particularly in the planning and development sectors - by working cooperatively across the region.

6.4 Aims

Planning for waste and recovered resource processing and disposal for the region beyond 2024.
Encouraging systems to ensure planning of the Region is undertaken in a sustainable manner and consideration of waste services are incorporated into DCP and waste guides.

Encourage Council to set an example and increase the reuse and recovery of waste from their own operations
Encouraging waste avoidance, with a focus on food organics.
Diverting more recyclable materials from our domestic garbage stream into recycling and reducing the levels of contamination in recyclables and garden organics bins.
Reducing the incidence of littering.
Reducing the incidence of illegal dumping.
Increase locations across the region for disposal of problem household waste
Applying for funding to support regional initiatives for education, community engagement and enhancement of existing Council-operated services and facilities.

7 HOW WILL WE GET THERE?

The councils currently achieved a recycling rate of 56% of kerbside collected waste and recyclables in 2016/2017. To improve on this achievement, the councils have identified the following future opportunities to assist in achieving key regional and state targets.

7.1 Waste and Recycling Infrastructure Needs

The Strategy identifies future waste and recycling infrastructure as a matter of critical importance to the Macarthur region and as such the Strategic Waste Alliance member Councils along with neighbouring Councils have come together to investigate future infrastructure and collection service options.

7.2 Planning and Waste Considerations

As the region has an intense focus on population growth and development over the next 10 to 20 years, it needs to ensure that waste servicing issues are considered at a high level and implement improvements to achieve the best outcomes for planning and waste services.

7.3 Reuse and Recycle Waste from Council Operations

The Strategy identifies opportunities to achieve greater landfill diversion for council generated non-domestic waste by approaching this issue from a regional perspective. Spoil has already been identified as the first resource to be investigated.

7.4 Management of Food Organics

Councils agree that food organics remains a significant portion of domestic garbage and needs inclusion in any future management options. Originally, with the disposal and processing of waste at the AWT site, food organics was not an issue. However, as only some of Councils’ waste is being processed, food organics remains a key focus area. Until the resolution of their joint disposal and processing contract, Councils will continue to investigate options for a waste disposal method to reach WARR targets, which may include a system for food and organics waste.

7.5 Education and Engagement

Contamination rates remain average to high within the region. A strategic approach to a regional education strategy on the three-bin system could help reduce this contamination rate. With the changing demographics and increasing housing densities across the region, a focus on MUD’s and tenanted properties is a high priority to ensure residents are aware of services offered. As tenants often move across Council boundaries, it is important to ensure they understand the service each Council offers. This can help to minimise illegal dumping and contamination of the bins.

7.6 Litter

Littering is as challenging as illegal dumping in terms of identifying, educating and where necessary, penalising offenders. Apart from greater enforcement of littering regulations, the Strategy will focus on education for building sites and roadsides.

7.7 Illegal Dumping

The Councils have an interest in sharing resources to combat illegal dumping. The cost of legal waste disposal, lack of awareness of proper disposal methods, and financial gain are all motivators for illegal dumping. Some materials collected from illegal dumping incidents and kerbside clean-ups could be recovered for reuse or recycling.

7.8 Problem Wastes

There is a need for continued support for disposal of problem wastes through the establishment of facilities under relevant product stewardship schemes and EPA grants. This will enable residents to safely and responsibly dispose of problem wastes. A mobile CRC may be an option for the region.

Councils will maintain a role in promoting resident E-waste drop-off, at authorised facilities in the region, to increased participation in E-waste recycling and reduce E-waste in kerbside clean-ups and achieve greater environmental outcomes.

7.9 Funding Opportunities

The NSW government has continued a funding package to support the Waste Less, Recycle More program. Councils have opportunities to access grant funding over the next four years to support initiatives that will contribute to the achievement of the state’s waste avoidance and resource recovery objectives and targets.

7.10 Engagement with Neighbouring Councils and Regions

The region shares boundaries with a number of other Councils and wider collaboration on projects, particularly for waste infrastructure may prove very beneficial.

8 THEMES

The themes were initially developed through identification of priority areas following consultation with stakeholders and the community. The themes take into account the region’s ability to achieve the Vision through the development of measurable objectives and achievable targets. The themes will ensure that the Macarthur region will continue to deliver a waste service that is adaptive and meeting the community’s needs.

Future regional planning and initiatives will focus strongly on meeting the Strategy’s targeted outcomes, setting the foundation for processing and disposal of waste for the Macarthur region beyond 2021.

8.1 Theme 1: Planning for Waste and Resource Recovery

Objective 1.1 Ensure planning controls provide for appropriate waste management conditions for future development.

8.2 Theme 2: Waste Avoidance and Reduction

Objective 2.1 Reduce waste per capita.

ACTIONS

1. Promote the ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ Program.
2. Support education initiatives that promote residents to reduce and reuse waste.

8.3 Theme 3: Recycling and Landfill Diversion

Objective 3.1 Facilitate a reduction in contamination levels in the waste streams.

8.4 Theme 4: Litter and Illegal Dumping

Objective 4.1 Reduce and manage the occurrences of illegally dumped waste.

Objective 4.2 Reduce and manage the occurrence of littering.

8.5 Theme 5: Management of Problem Wastes

Objective 5.1 Facilitate the reduction of problem wastes from waste streams.

8.6 Theme 6: Advocacy

Objective 6.1 Strategic Waste Alliance Regional Waste Coordinator assist and coordinate responses to relevant issues.

9 ACTION PLAN

Based on the Strategy, a detailed Action Plan (Appendix 7) has been developed, outlining the specific initiatives to be taken to achieve the objectives of the Strategy. The Action Plan will assist the region to meet the goals of the Strategy by assigning responsibilities and timelines. The Action Plan will be reviewed annually.

10 STRATEGIC REVIEW

The legislative framework is constantly evolving and requires regular monitoring. Due to the changing nature of the operating environment, regular reviews of the Strategy and its objectives and Action Plan will be undertaken to determine how any change in policy will affect the Councils’ and the community’s performance.

11 APPENDICES

Appendix 1 – STRATEGIES AND POLICIES DRIVING WASTE AVOIDANCE AND RESOURCE RECOVERY IN THE MACARTHUR REGION

National Policy Drivers

National Environment Protection Act 1994 (Cwth) – binds all State and Territory jurisdictions to the principles of Ecologically Sustainable Development.

National Waste Policy 2009 Less Waste, More Resources

sets a national waste management framework for the period 2009–2020.

Product Stewardship Act and Product Stewardship (Televisions & Computers) Regulations 2011 – require manufacturers of TVs and computers to provide for the end-of-life recycling of these products. Paints and batteries are likely to be the next products to be covered by such an arrangement.

The Australian Packaging Covenant – a voluntary co-regulatory arrangement which requires manufacturers, importers or brand owners to take responsibility for the packaging they produce.

Container Deposit Scheme – this approach has been proposed under the National Waste Policy 2009. The scheme commenced in NSW on 1 December 2017.

National Food Waste Strategy 2017 – Provides a framework to support collective action towards halving Australia’s Food organics by half by 2030.

State Government Policy Drivers

Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Act 2001

aims to encourage the efficient use of resources and reduce environmental harm, in accordance with the principles of ecological sustainable development and sets the framework for the NSW Government’s WARR Strategy.

NSW Government WARR Strategy 2014-2021 addresses the following area:

Support investment in much needed infrastructure
Encourage innovation and improve recycling behaviour
Develop new markets for recycled materials
And reduce litter and illegal dumping

The strategy sets the following targets for 2021-22

Avoiding and reducing the amount of waste generated per person in NSW
Increase recycling rates to

º 70% for municipal solid waste

º 70% for commercial and industrial waste

º 80% for construction and demolition waste

Increase waste diverted from landfill to 75%
Managing problem waste better, establishing 80 drop-off facilities and services across NSW
Reducing litter, with 40% fewer items (compared to 2012) by 2017
Combat illegal dumping with 30% fewer incidents (compared to 2011) by 2017

NSW 2021 – the NSW Government’s Premiers Priorities to make NSW a better place to live and work. Under keeping our environment clean; reducing litter is a key issues and a target to reducing litter by 40% by 2020 in included.

NSW Waste and Environment Levy – a levy imposed on all Macarthur Councils materials that are landfilled.

Waste Less, Recycle More – The NSW Government has announced the extension of the Waste Less, Recycle More initiative with a further $337 million over four years from 2017-2021. This extension guarantees funding from

1 July until 2021 to continue the work already underway to modernise the waste sector in NSW, deliver waste and recycling services to the community and ensure a clean environment.

Protection of the Environment and Operations Act 1997 (POEO Act) – a key piece of legislation that underpins all activities related to waste and the environment.

Protection of the Environment Operations Amendment (Illegal Waste Disposal) Act 2013 – includes stronger penalties for offenders who commit or are privy to waste offences.

NSW Government Illegal Dumping Strategy

2017-2020 – builds on the 2014-2016 strategy. The NSW Government’s commitment to reducing illegal dumping is backed by continued funding ($65 million) under the Waste Less Recycle More initiative. This funding will support a range of innovative solutions to illegal dumping, delivered in partnership with councils, industry and the community.

NSW Government Litter Strategy – The NSW Government is serious about reducing litter. The Premier has made it a personal Premier’s Priority to reduce litter volume in NSW by 40% by 2020, one of 12 Premier’s Priorities. To meet this target, the EPA is working hard with councils, businesses, state government agencies and the community, guided by NSW’s first Litter Prevention Strategy.

Energy from Waste Policy Statement 2015 – The Environment Protection Authority (EPA) recognises that the recovery of energy and resources from the thermal processing of waste has the potential, as part of an integrated waste management strategy, to deliver positive outcomes for the community and the environment.

Local Policy Drivers

Integrated Planning and Reporting – an integrated approach to the development of council budgets and activities, including a Community Strategic Plan, Delivery Program and Operational Plan.

Camden Council

Camden Community Strategic Plan – updated 2017

Camden Council has adopted a vision for Camden that provides direction for Council and the community in terms of its planning and activities and their implementation to achieve the desired goals by 2040.

New Housing Release Waste Systems Analysis Project Report 2015

Camden Council engaged GHD to undertake what service options would be best suited to the new housing release areas of the Council area.

Campbelltown City Council

Campbelltown’s Community Strategic Plan 2017-2027

Campbelltown’s Community Strategic Plan is a 10 year plan that sets the community’s high level objectives for the LGA and the strategies to be implemented to achieve these objectives.

Campbelltown (Sustainable City) Development Control Plan (DCP) 2015 updates in 2016 and 2017

The Campbelltown Sustainable City DCP outlines the objectives and requirements for certain developments in relation to waste minimisation including objectives and design requirements for waste management plans, construction and demolition phases of the development and ongoing waste management requirements when the development is complete.

Wollondilly Shire Council

Wollondilly Community Strategic Plan 2033

The plan identifies the aims of the community and sets out the strategies that council will use to achieve these aims. The plan addresses environmental considerations including waste.

Sustainable Wollondilly Plan

This plan establishes how Council will work towards a more sustainable future and includes a commitment to implement a waste management and resource recovery strategy.

Wollondilly Waste Minimisation and Resource Recovery Strategy 2013-2018

Council has adopted a WMRR Strategy that is consistent with achieving the waste targets set out in the Community Strategic Plan 2033.

Wollondilly Education Strategy 2014-2019

The purpose of the strategy is to deliver Council’s Waste Minimisation and Resource Recovery Strategy (WMRRS), focusing on 15 key target areas and includes 38 separate programs.

Wollondilly Shire Council Development Control Plan (DCP) 2016

The DCP provides waste minimisation and management guidance to developers and others involved in demolition and constructions work.

Appendix 2 – WASTE AND RESOURCE RECOVERY COLLECTION SYSTEMS

Domestic garbage: Each Council provides a weekly service and bin and lid colours comply with the Australian Standard.

Recyclables: Collection services include a 240L mobile garbage bin (MGB). Service frequencies vary between Councils’ with Camden providing a weekly collection and Campbelltown and Wollondilly fortnightly collections. Bin and lid colours comply with the Australian Standard, which specifies a dark green or black container and a yellow lid.

Garden Organics: Collection services include a 240L MGB. Camden provides a weekly collection, while the other Councils’ provide fortnightly collections on alternating weeks with recyclables collection. Bin and lid colours comply with the Australian Standard.

Kerbside clean-ups: The number and frequency of kerbside clean-ups vary across Councils’. Campbelltown provides four kerbside clean-ups per year on an on-call basis. Camden provides two kerbside clean-ups per year, also on an on-call basis. Wollondilly offers a twice-yearly scheduled service.

Additional services available to residents: In Addition to council kerbside clean-up services, residents use a variety of local waste disposal facilities which accept a range of waste types.

Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2017-2021

Appendix 3 – KERBSIDE WASTE AND RESOURCE RECOVERY COLLECTION AND PROCESSING CONTRACTS

Council

Services Covered

Service Provider

Contract Duration (years)

Contract Expiry Date

Specific Conditions

Camden

Garbage collection

Council

In-house service

In-house service

No medical waste, batteries, tree stumps or building materials.

Recyclables collection

Council

In-house service

In-house service

Items must be loose. Containers to be rinsed. No waxed cardboard or containers contaminated with excessive food.

Garden organics collection

Council

In-house service

In-house service

Only organic plant material. No food scraps, soil or tree stumps.

Kerbside clean-up collection

Council

In-house service

In-house service

Up to three cubic metres, two clean-ups per year per household on-call. Only toys, beds, mattresses, furniture, household electrical, white goods and garden organics.

Garbage, recyclables, garden organics and kerbside clean-up processing/disposal

Contract

15

31 May

2024

All materials collected from kerbside.

Council

Services Covered

Service Provider

Contract Duration (years)

Contract Expiry Date

Specific Conditions

Campbelltown

Garbage collection

Contract

9

1 April

2023

No medical waste, batteries, tree stumps or building materials. This contract has a 14 month extension option.

Recyclables collection

Contract

9

1 April

2023

Items must be loose. Containers to be rinsed. No waxed cardboard or containers contaminated with excessive food. This contract has a 14 month extension option.

Garden organics collection

Contract

9

1 April

2023

Only organic plant material. No food scraps, soil or tree stumps. This contract has a 14 month extension option.

Kerbside clean-up collection

Contract

9

1 April

2023

Up to two cubic metres, four times per year per household on-call. Only toys, beds, mattresses, furniture, household electrical, white goods and garden organics. This contract has a 14 month extension option.

Garbage, recyclables, garden organics and kerbside clean-up processing/disposal

Contract

15

31 May

2024

All materials collected from kerbside.

Wollondilly

Garbage collection

Contract

10

30 June

2025

No medical waste, batteries, tree stumps or building materials.

Recyclables collection

Contract

10

30 June

2025

Items must not be bagged. Containers to be rinsed. No waxed cardboard or containers contaminated with food.

Garden organics collection

Contract

10

30 June

2025

Only organic plant material. No food scraps, soil or tree stumps.

Kerbside clean-up collection

Contract

10

30 June

2025

Up to one and a half cubic metres, twice per year per household. No hazardous materials, medical waste, garden organics, commercial waste, household garbage or chemicals.

Garbage, recyclables, garden organics and kerbside clean-up processing/disposal

Contract

15

31 May

2024

All materials collected from kerbside.

Appendix 4 – SPRING FARM FACILITY OPERATIONS

The Spring Farm Resource Recovery Centre occupies 38 hectares of land within the Camden LGA and comprises:

Transfer Facility – The Councils domestic garbage is delivered to this facility, where it is transferred to landfill or to another processing facility.
Landfill – The landfill section of the facility is now closed, and waste is redirected to other SUEZ facilities.
Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) – The MRF receives and processes materials collected from residents’ recyclables bins. This facility uses traditional MRF technology. Residual waste rejected from the MRF is re-directed to the landfill.
Camden Organic Resource Recovery Facility – The current joint contract requires the contents of all residential garden organics bins to be delivered to this facility. Contaminants are manually removed, and the garden organics are loaded into airtight concrete tunnels, where they undergo in-vessel composting. The tunnels are monitored and computer-controlled to maintain specific temperature, moisture and oxygen levels at different stages of the composting process. Upon maturation, the garden organics are removed and transported direct to market or to the SUEZ Lucas Heights Organics Facility. Here, the garden organics are further screened for contaminants and blended with blended with other materials to create various end- products such as high and low-grade compost and soil mixes.
Resident and commercial drop-off areas – The Spring Farm RRC operates as a commercial facility, allowing residents and commercial waste collection companies to drop off both putrescible and non-putrescible waste.

Appendix 5 – WASTE INFRASTRUCTURE ACROSS WIDER SYDNEY REGION

Facility type

Name

Location

Type of material sent

Materials Recovery Facility

Spring Farm Materials Recycling Facility

275 Richardson Road Spring Farm

Recyclables

Within the Region

VISY

Smithfield

Recyclables

Outside the region

Polytrade

Rydalmere

Recyclables

Outside the region

ACT Government MRF

Hume

Recyclables

Outside the region

Recovery Facility

Spring Farm Resource Recovery Facility

Richardson Road Spring Farm

Organics

Within the Region

SUEZ Eastern Creek Organics Recovery Facility

Wallgrove Road Eastern Creek

Organics

Outside the Region

Benedict Sands - Menangle

Menangle Road Menangle

Organics

Within the Region

W2R and Hi-Quality

769 The Northern Road Bringelly

Organics

Within the Region

ANL Badgerys Creek

210 Martin Road Badgerys Creek

Organics

Outside the Region

ANL Blayney Organics Processing facility

755 Browns Creek Road Blaney

Organics

Outside the Region

Veolia Woodlawn MBT Facility:

619 Collector Road Tarago

Organics

Outside the Region

SUEZ SAWT facility

Kemps Creek

Mechanical Biological Treatment

Outside the Region

Genesis Xero Waste Facility

Honeycomb Drive Eastern Creek

Outside the Region

Global renewables UR-3R

Eastern Creek

Mechanical Biological Treatment

Outside the Region

SUEZ Bedminster facility

Port Stephens

Mechanical Biological Treatment

Outside the Region

Biomass Solutions

Coffs Harbour

Mechanical Heat Treated

Outside the Region

Waste Treatment Facility

Environmental Treatment Solutions

12 Shaw Road Ingleburn

Hazardous

Within the Region

Facility type

Name

Location

Type of material sent

Landfill

Bargo Waste Management Centre

Anthony Road Bargo

Dry waste

Within the Region

Veolia Environmental Services Woodlawn Eco Project

619 Collector Road Tarago

Residual

Outside the Region

Veolia Landfill

Horsley Park

Residual

Outside the Region

Glenfield Waste Disposal

Cambridge Avenue Glenfield

Dry waste

Within the Region

Blacktown waste service landfill

920 Richmond Road Marsden Park

Residual

Outside the Region

Blaxland Waste Management Facility

Attunga Road Blaxland

Residual

Outside the Region

Hawkesbury City Council Waste Management Facility

1 The Driftway South Windsor

Residual

Outside the Region

SUEZ Kemps Creek Landfill

1725 Elizabeth Drive Kemps Creek

Residual

Outside the Region

SUEZ Lucas Heights Landfill

New Illawarra Road Lucas Heights

Residual

Outside the Region

Appendix 6 – EXISTING PROGRAMS AND INITIATIVES

Apart from the regular collection of residential bins and bulky waste, a number of resource recovery programs exist throughout the region. The programs are encouraged by both the Councils’ and the EPA in order to minimise waste contamination and to increase resource recovery rates.

Many of these programs are free but require residents to deposit their waste at certain locations.

Annual Household Chemical Cleanout event – The EPA organises annual chemical waste clean-ups, which are hosted by Councils’. These events encourage householders to bring unwanted chemicals and hazardous materials to drop-off locations for safe disposal. Keeping chemicals and other hazardous materials out of MSW provides for a safer community and reduces damage to the environment.

E-waste drop off facilities - The appropriate disposal of E-waste is encouraged by the Councils’ through their promotion of the drop-off facilities which have been created across the region under the product stewardship scheme (currently televisions and computer equipment only) and at Bargo Waste Management centre. Because E-waste continues to be accepted in kerbside clean-ups to ensure residents have a convenient method of disposal.

Free Recyclables Drop-off event – On the first Saturday in January, Campbelltown City Council holds a free event at which residents may drop off surplus items that they would normally dispose of in the recyclables bin. In addition, residents may drop off polystyrene. This event was created following observations that residents had excess recyclables and polystyrene following Christmas and New Year festivities.

Home composting and worm farms – The use of worm farms and compost bins are encouraged to divert of Food organics from the domestic garbage stream. Free workshops are provided for adults and primary school students on how to use these systems.

Development Control Plans – Development Control Plans (DCPs) set out council policies and guidelines on a range of matters, including waste management requirements for residential dwellings and commercial premises, subdivisions, construction and demolition works. Councils require that Waste Management Plans form part of Development Applications for certain types of developments, including multi-unit and mixed-used dwellings. Within the Waste Management Plan, the applicant must identify the amount of waste to be generated and the methods for managing and ensuring resource recovery, recycling and responsible disposal.

Love Food Hate Waste Program – Love Food Hate Waste is a program developed by the NSW EPA to raise awareness of Food organics and its impact. The program is focused on educating the community to reduce Food organics by more prudent purchasing and storage and re-use of excess food.

Camden Council’s Project Lunchbox is supported by the NSW EPA and funded through the Love Food Hate Waste program.

Wollondilly Council utilises the Love Food Hate Waste program to encourage the community to reduce Food organics and buy local fresh produce through, for example, the Wollondilly Harvest Experience. For more information on this initiative, see

www.wollondillyharvestexperience.com.au

In 2018, MACROC was successful in obtaining EPA grant funding to run the Food Smart program. In summary the program was presented to 20 onsite MCSL workshops, 7 off-site community workshops and festivals and via repeat Facebook posts. Overall, almost 500 families had face to face exposure to the project with Facebook results showing 6,188 people were reached. Other project outcomes included:

81% reported preparing shopping lists
92% reported checking food at home before shopping
70% reported increased meal planning
82% reported increased consideration of portion size
48 participants attended the Cooking with Leftovers workshops
A reduction of 91% in food waste recorded by those that completed all surveys
Participants reported saving between $20-$100 pw on their weekly food budget

Home composting is encouraged across the region in order to minimise the amount of organic material in the waste stream.

Macarthur Centre for Sustainable Living (MCSL)

The MCSL is proudly sponsored by Campbelltown City Council and supported by the Macarthur Councils’ and the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust. It is a not for profit organisation that hosts a variety of activities and experiences focused on sustainable living.

The MCSL offers school and community access programs to educate the community about sustainable living and technologies. The MCSL facilitates the Councils’ community waste education programs targeted at adults and children. These programs include community workshops on home composting, worm farms, keeping chickens and reducing Food organics, all with a strong theme of waste avoidance and reduction.

In addition to workshops and activities based at the centre, the MCSL provides workshops and interactive learning

activities at schools, such as audits of the schools’ waste bins and ‘Recyc-Olympics’ events. The Recyc-Olympic event was developed by Campbelltown Council as a fun way for children to learn the appropriate use of each of the three household waste bins. This event has proven to be popular at both schools and at major community events.

Waste and recycling guides and other educational material – The Councils’ produce educational materials to promote good recycling and waste management behaviour and make this information available via websites, brochures, and advertising. The Strategy identifies the benefit of a regional approach to raising waste awareness and providing education for the three-bin system.

Spring Farm RRP - The Councils’ kerbside collected MSW processing and disposal contractor provides tours of the Spring Farm facility to adults and students.

Macarthur Centre for Sustainable Living (MCSL)

Appendix 7 – REGIONAL ACTION PLAN 2019-2021

PROJECT / ACTION NAME

PROJECT OBJECTIVE

BRIEF DETAIL OF PROJECT/ACTION

DETAILED ACTION

TARGETS

TIMEFRAMES

2019 2020

2020 2021

Theme 1: LOCAL AND REGIONAL PLANNING

Future Development

Ensure planning controls provide for appropriate waste management conditions for future development

Ensure a consistent waste management approach to service requirements for a development type and assessment of Development applications, specifically for multi-unit dwellings and mixed-use sites.

Development of standard guiding principle for a Waste Guide for the region to support the DCP review and development of standard condition for Councils DCP and to ensure all future developments provide for residents the best practice waste service and best practice in accessibility for contractors.

Regional Waste guiding principles and Guide developed to support Councils DCP requirements.

Implement the set of guiding principles for the region, in accordance with any new Department of Planning templates or DCP’s.

Councils using guidelines by June 2021.

Theme 2: WASTE AVOIDANCE AND REDUCTION

Waste Reduction

Reduce waste per capita

Promote the ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ program.

Investigate options under the EPA’s food waste grant funding program.

To reduce the average weight of MSW per household by 3 % by 2021.

New or continuation of food organics program by end of 2020.

Promote campaigns to encourage residents to reduce and reuse waste.

Council to investigate a soft plastic collection campaign for recycling.

Investigation options for soft plastic recycling by December 2019.

Soft plastic recycling implemented and promoted by June 2020.

Theme 3: RECYCLING AND LANDFILL DIVERSION

Reducing Contamination

Facilitate a reduction of contamination levels in the waste streams.

Develop a regional education campaign for the 3-bin system to increase residents understanding of the system and what goes in each bin and to reduce contamination.

Using and integrating social research already conducted into behaviour change, to design and deliver a regional education and communications campaign that incorporates improved recycling behaviours. This may include a targeted program for unit blocks and /or delivering workshops to reinforce the education campaign, including CALD communities.

To reduce/maintain each SWA council's contamination rate in the pre-collection recyclables stream to below 8% by 2021 and organics stream to 4% by 2021.

Education program developed by December 2019.

Rolled out across the region by December 2020.

Undertake regional waste audits including for CDS eligible containers.

The Waste Audits will be used to record contamination levels and gauge the effectiveness of the education campaign. By including a CDS container count to inform the uptake of the “Return and Earn" program by residents.

Increase awareness of the Container Deposit Scheme and ensure contamination rates are reduced.

Consultation with member Councils to investigate the need for follow up CDS auditing to be conducted in November 2020

Theme 4: LITTER AND ILLEGAL DUMPING

Illegal Dumping

Reduce and manage the occurrence of illegally dumped waste.

Implement a regional illegal dumping campaign and promote EPA (or similar) 'Dumping Its Dumb' Campaign.

Regional Illegal Dumping strategy will assist Councils in meeting state targets for reducing illegal dumping across the Region.

Develop strategy and measure against the target of reduction per capita weight of illegally dumped material.

Strategy to be developed by June 2020.

Arrange forum and ongoing liaison with real estate agents, strata managers and public housing organisations to develop and maintain anti-illegal dumping initiatives for tenanted properties.

Establish rapport with local real estate agents and strata managers and invite to a workshop/meetings to discuss the common issues of illegal dumping.

Development of an “moving in/ out" campaign targeting unit block residents and tenants that Real estate agents can asset in delivering.

As part of the Regional Illegal Dumping Strategy, incorporate consultation with real estate agents and strata managers.

Strategy to be developed by June 2020.

Reduce Litter

Implement projects from L-RIP

To provide litter education programs to the region.

To reduce the volume of litter by 40%.

Continue and finalise L-RIP initiative commenced in 2018 2019

Theme 5: MANAGEMENT OF PROBLEM WASTES

Problem Waste

Facilitate the reduction of problem wastes from waste streams.

Promote services available for recycling / re-use of problem wastes (e.g. e-waste, tyres, batteries, paints).

Awaiting the opening of the Campbelltown CRC. Investigate options for other CRC locations or mobile CRC's.

10% increase on previous years data/collection figures.

Commencement joint RFQ process with individual contracts for the regional battery recycling initiative.

Investigate the expansion of the program to other problem wastes such as CDs/DVDS.

Investigation for CRC locations by June 2021.

Investigate Asbestos programs.

Asbestos is an issue across the state and investigations into dumping hotspots followed by consideration to a disposal program.

Pending options for funding from grants or councils support.

Theme 6: ADVOCACY

Advocacy for the Region

SWA Regional Waste Coordinator to assist and coordinate responses to relevant issues.

SWA to advocate for more government support and collaboration on planning future waste infrastructure needs for the region.

SWA Regional Waste Coordinator acting on behalf of the three member councils can often carry more influence than an individual council.

Number of

hours assisting

Councils.

Number of regional submissions.

Number of forums, workshop and meetings attended.

Ongoing

Ongoing